The Pulchritudinous Review, Issue Three by Reckon

ThePR3(Original)

The PR:  Issue Three is an experimental literary magazine of poetry, art, collage, photography, and design.

This issue features: Alice Notley, Amiri Baraka, Elizabeth Robinson,

Jack Collom, Hillary Keel, Chris Weige,

Damian Rogers, Renee Zepeda, Brandi Strickland,

Lina Scheynius, and many new emerging writers...

ThePR3(Original)

Poèm Objet by André Breton by Reckon

Poèm Objet by André Breton, 1935.

Collage of object and inscribed poem on card on wood.

From the National Galleries of Scotland:

Breton’s personal contribution to surrealist art was his fusion of poetry and object in his ‘Poème-Objet’ constructions. Although not an artist himself, he was eager to explore any technique that required minimum artistic skill, such as the collages and assemblages. In 1924, Breton called for the creation of objects seen in dreams. He made about a dozen of his own assemblages in the 1930s and early 1940s, calling them ‘Poème-Objets’. The text on the plaster egg in this work translates as ‘I see / I imagine’ and the poem beneath is deliberately cryptic.

The poem reads:

A l’intersection de lignes de force invisibles Trouver Le point de chant vers quoi les arbres se font la courte échelle L’épine de silence Qui veut que le seigneur des navires livre au vent son panache de chiens bleus (At the intersection of invisible lines of force To find The focal point towards which trees give each other a leg up The thorn of silence That wants the lord of the ships to give the winds its panache of blue dogs)

Curator’s Note: The poem was produced through automatism. It’s not “deliberately cryptic” per se; rather, it’s a confluence of consciousness.

Lethologica by Reckon

Lethologica

36th Summer Writing Program Magazine

The Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics

Naropa University

SWP blog

Editors:

Michael D. Edwards

Annie Maier

Bradley Sands

Book Design:  Bradley Sands and Michael D. Edwards

Cover Design:  Michael D. Edwards

2010, Naropa Press

Boulder, Colorado

Poetry:  Renee Zepeda, Chris Weige

Photos:  Chiai Matsumoto

Arthur Rimbaud Documentary by Reckon

It’s the life of the great French poet, Arthur Rimbaud, in a 10 minute slideshow. The video traces the arc of Rimbaud’s short life (1854–1891), stitching together images from 19th century France, photos taken by Rimbaud himself, and manuscripts scribbled by the poet. In the background, Joan Baez reads lines from Rimbaud’s famous collection,Illuminations, which appears in the Poetry section of our Free Audio Books collection. Project Gutenberg also makes his complete works available in French. Download the free e-text right here.

from Open Culture | Rimbaud:  A Life in Slideshow

A Defence of Poetry by Percy Bysshe Shelley by Reckon

Poetry turns all things to loveliness; it exalts the beauty of that which is most beautiful, and it adds beauty to that which is most deformed; it marries exultation and horror, grief and pleasure, eternity and change; it subdues to union under its light yoke all irreconcilable things. It transmutes all that it touches, and every form moving within the radiance of its presence is changed by wondrous sympathy to an incarnation of the spirit which it breathes: its secret alchemy turns to potable gold the poisonous waters which flow from death through life; it strips the veil of familiarity from the world, and lays bare the naked and sleeping beauty, which is the spirit of its forms. All things exist as they are perceived: at least in relation to the percipient. “The mind is its own place, and of itself can make a heaven of hell, a hell of heaven.” But poetry defeats the curse which binds us to be subjected to the accident of surrounding impressions. And whether it spreads its own figured curtain, or withdraws life’s dark veil from before the scene of things, it equally creates for us a being within our being. It makes us the inhabitants of a world to which the familiar world is a chaos. It reproduces the common universe of which we are portions and percipients, and it purges from our inward sight the film of familiarity which obscures from us the wonder of our being. It compels us to feel that which we perceive, and to imagine that which we know. It creates anew the universe, after it has been annihilated in our minds by the recurrence of impressions blunted by reiteration. It justifies the bold and true words of Tasso—“Non merita nome di creatore, se non Iddio ed il Poeta.”

...

The most unfailing herald, companion, and follower of the awakening of a great people to work a beneficial change in opinion or institution, is poetry. At such periods there is an accumulation of the power of communicating and receiving intense and impassioned conceptions respecting man and nature. The person in whom this power resides, may often, as far as regards many portions of their nature, have little apparent correspondence with that spirit of good of which they are the ministers. But even whilst they deny and abjure, they are yet compelled to serve, that power which is seated on the throne of their own soul. It is impossible to read the compositions of the most celebrated writers of the present day without being startled with the electric life which burns within their words. They measure the circumference and sound the depths of human nature with a comprehensive and all-penetrating spirit, and they are themselves perhaps the most sincerely astonished at its manifestations; for it is less their spirit than the spirit of the age. Poets are the hierophants of an unapprehended inspiration; the mirrors of the gigantic shadows which futurity casts upon the present; the words which express what they understand not; the trumpets which sing to battle, and feel not what they inspire; the influence which is moved not, but moves. Poets are the unacknowledged legislators of the world.

Read the essay: http://www.bartleby.com/27/23.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Defence_of_Poetry

Img: From The golden book of Coleridge, London, New York, 1922

via Escape into Life

Eureka by Reckon

Eureka (1848) is a lengthy non-fiction work by American author Edgar Allan Poe which he subtitled "A Prose Poem", though it has also been subtitled as "An Essay on the Material and Spiritual Universe". Adapted from a lecture he had presented, Eureka describes Poe's intuitive conception of the nature of the universe with no scientific work done to reach his conclusions. He also discusses man's relationship with God, whom he compares to an author. It is dedicated to the German naturalist and explorer Alexander von Humboldt. Though it is generally considered a literary work, some of Poe's ideas anticipate discoveries of the 20th century. Indeed a critical analysis of the scientific content of Eureka reveals a non-causal correspondence with modern cosmology due to the assumption of an evolving Universe, but excludes the anachronistic anticipation of relativistic concepts such as black holes.

Eureka was received poorly in Poe's day and generally described as absurd, even by friends. Modern critics continue to debate the significance of Eureka and some doubt its seriousness, in part because of Poe's many incorrect assumptions and his comedic descriptions of well-known historical minds. Presented as a poem, many compare it with his fiction work, especially science fiction stories such as "The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar". His attempts at discovering the truth also follow his own tradition of "ratiocination", a term used in hisdetective fiction tales. Poe's suggestion that the soul continues to thrive even after death also parallels with works in which characters reappear from beyond the grave such as "Ligeia". The essay is oddly transcendental, considering Poe's disdain for the movement. He considered it his greatest work and claimed it was more important than the discovery of gravity.

Eureka is Poe's last major work and his longest non-fiction work at nearly 40,000 words in length. The work has its origins in a lecture Poe presented on February 3, 1848, titled "On The Cosmography of the Universe" at the Society Library in New York. He had expected an audience of hundreds; only 60 attended and were confused by the topic. Poe had hoped the profits from the lecture would cover expenses for the production of his new journal The Stylus.

Eureka is Poe's attempt at explaining the universe, using his general proposition "Because Nothing was, therefore All Things are". In it, Poe discusses man's relationship to God and the universe or, as he offers at the beginning: "I design to speak of the Physical, Metaphysical and Mathematical – of the Material and Spiritual Universe: of its Essence, its Origin, its Creation, its Present Condition and its Destiny". In keeping with this design, Poe concludes "that space and duration are one" and that matter and spirit are made of the same essence.  Poe suggests that people have a natural tendency to believe in themselves as infinite with nothing greater than their soul—such thoughts stem from man's residual feelings from when each shared an original identity with God. Ultimately individual consciousnesses will collapse back into a similar single mass, a "final ingathering" where the "myriads of individual Intelligences become blended". Likewise, Poe saw the universe itself as infinitely expanding and collapsing like a divine heartbeat which constantly rejuvenates itself, also implying a sort of deathlessness. In fact, because the soul is a part of this constant throbbing, after dying, all people, in essence, become God.

Eureka, A Prose Poem (Wikipedia entry)

Full text from the 1848 edition

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poetry is by Reckon

by George Quasha

61 POETS IN VOL. I:

Ammiel Alcalay, Hector Alves, David Antin, Arman, Coleman Barks, Caroline Bergvall, Charles Bernstein, Mei-Mei Berssenbrugge, Harvey Bialy, Blue, Lee Ann Brown, Tisa Bryant, Elizabeth Clark, Michael Coffey, Alan Davies, Michel Deguy, Timotha Doane, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Allen Fisher, Joanna Fuhrman, Eric Gansworth, Steven Goodman, Carla Harryman, Kevin Hart, David Henderson, Mitch Highfill, Bob Holman, Anselm Hollo, Mikhail Horowitz, Fanny Howe, Susan Howe, Romana Huk, Franz Kamin, Robert Kelly, Richard Kostelanetz, Louise Landes Levi, Judith Malina, Chris Mann, Michael Meade, Joyce Carol Oates, Sharon Olds, Cheryl Pallant, Nick Piombino, Kristen Prevallet, India Radfar, Carter Ratcliff, Hanon Reznikov, Jerome Rothenberg, Sapphire, Leslie Scalapino, Ron Silliman, Charles Stein, David Levi Strauss, Kate Suddes, Chris Tysh, Cecilia Vicuña, Tenzin Wangyal, Barrett Watten, Henry Weinfield, Elizabeth Willis, Krzysztof Ziarek

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The Twitstat Project (now in limited edition + electric) by Reckon

The Twitstat Project

A collaborative double book of new/experimental poetry by Chris Weige and Renee Zepeda (Spring 2010).

Published, designed, and edited by Renee Zepeda and The Pulchritudinous Press:

60 pages, hand-sewn binding, Strathmore-style paper, cherry vellum, personal stamp & bookmark.

Inspired in part by the Twitstat application, whereby users post 140 character messages via mobile phone to Twitter.

Printed in a special limited edition of 36 copies in Boulder, Colorado.

Cover art and photography by Chiai Matsumoto

Purchase a limited edition of The Twitstat Project

Purchase the electronic PDF version

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Walking On Eggshells: Borrowing Culture in the Remix Age by Reckon

"Walking on Eggshells" is a 24-minute documentary about appropriation, creative influence, re-use and intellectual property in the remix age. It is a conversation among various musicians, visual artists, writers and lawyers, all sharing their views on why and how we use and create culture, and how intellectual property law, originally designed to provide people with incentives to create, sometimes hinders creative production far more than it enhances it. This film is our final project for the seminar "Intellectual Property in the Digital Age" at Yale University. Directed and Produced by: Jacob Albert Ryan Beauchamp Brendan Schlagel Interviews with (in order of appearance): Eclectic Method DJ Earworm (Jordan Roseman) Joy Garnett Michael Cunningham Dudley Andrew DJ Ripley (Larisa Mann) Jonathan Lethem E. Michael Harrington Edgar Garcia

via Ariam Sahle

If nature has made any one thing less susceptible than all others of exclusive property, it is the action of the thinking power called an idea, which an individual may exclusively possess as long as he keeps it to himself; but the moment it is divulged, it forces itself into the possession of every one, and the receiver cannot dispossess himself of it. Its peculiar character, too, is that no one possesses the less, because every other possesses the whole of it. He who receives an idea from me, receives instruction himself without lessening mine; as he who lights his taper at mine, receives light without darkening me. That ideas should freely spread from one to another over the globe, for the moral and mutual instruction of man, and improvement of his condition, seems to have been peculiarly and benevolently designed by nature, when she made them, like fire, expansible over all space, without lessening their density in any point, and like the air in which we breathe, move, and have our physical being, incapable of confinement or exclusive appropriation. Inventions then cannot, in nature, be a subject of property.

~ Thomas Jefferson

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Gathering Paradise: Bill Murray Reads to Construction Workers at Poets House by Reckon

Members of the construction team which built Poets House's new home joined actor Bill Murray in May 2009 for the first poetry reading at 10 River Terrace. Produced for Poets House by Limey Films, Inc.

Poets House is a national poetry library and literary center that invites poets and the public to step into the living tradition of poetry. Our poetry resources and literary events document the wealth and diversity of modern poetry, and stimulate public dialogue on issues of poetry in culture.

http://poetshouse.org/

The New York Times, the Weekend Arts section: Transparent New Home for Poetry

Associated Press National Poetry Library Reopens in Lower Manhattan

New York Post A Poets House by Any Other Name

Library Journal Poets House Debuts Its New Home

NY1 television Poets House Reopens in Battery Park City

Downtown Express The Sofas Are Old, But the Poets' Home Is New

Real Clear Arts You Don't Have To Be A Poet To Love Poets House

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John Lennon's Handwritten Lyrics for A Day In The Life by Reckon

NEW YORK, NY.- On 18 June 2010 Sotheby’s New York will offer for sale John Lennon’s autograph Lyrics for A Day In The Life – the revolutionary song that marked the Beatles transformation from pop icons to artists. The double-sided sheet of paper in Lennon’s hand is complete with cross-outs, corrections, reworkings, and chronicles the evolution of one of the most famous pop masterpieces from conception to the lyrics presumably used in the recording studio. A Day In The Life was the final track of the Beatles legendary 1967 album, Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, which spent 27 weeks at the top of the UK’s charts and 15 weeks at number one on the American Billboard 200. The lyrics once belonged to Mal Evans, the Beatles’ road manager and are estimated to fetch $500/700,000.From the first time it was aired on 1 June 1967, A Day In The Life was recognized as one of the towering achievements of popular music, that elevated not only the Beatles to new levels but allowed pop music to take its place as one of the 20th century’s defining artistic movements. The handwritten lyrics provide a rare glimpse into the Beatles’ songwriting dynamic with Lennon noting where Paul McCartney would insert his lively upbeat verses. The lyrics bound from the darkly morbid – “he blew his mind out in a car,” supposedly referencing the accidental death of Tara Browne, the Guinness heir and close friend of both Lennon and McCartney, to the trivial; ‘4,000 holes in Blackburn Lancashire,’’ which was inspired by a bizarre road traffic scheme in North West England. This contrast, coupled with the soaring melody and the frequent use of classical instruments gives the song a depth that was absent from the Beatle’s earlier pop songs.

A Day In The Life sparked instant controversy upon its release. It was banned by the BBC because of the line ‘I’d love to turn you on’ which supposedly encouraged drug use, making it the first song to be censored by a national radio network in the UK. A Day In The Life was also omitted from the album when it was released in several Asian countries. Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band topped the US and UK charts, won four Grammy awards in 1968, topped Q Magazine’s list of the 50 Greatest British Songs of All Time and ranked number 26 in Rolling Stone’s list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

via artdaily

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Zimoun: Sound Sculptures & Installations by Reckon

Zimoun : Sound Sculptures & Installations
Compilation Video V1.7 / Last update: March 2010

Zimoun's sound sculptures and installations are graceful, mechanized works of playful poetry, their structural simplicity opens like an industrial bloom to reveal a complex and intricate series of relationships, an ongoing interplay between the «artificial» and the «organic».

He is interested in the artistic research of simple and elegant systems to generate and study complex behaviours in sound and motion. He creates sound pieces from basic components, often using multiples of the same prepared mechanical elements to examine the creation and degeneration of patterns.

Website: zimoun.ch

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VOICEsVOICEs - Origins by Reckon

L.A. shoegazers VOICEsVOICEs' new Origins EP has been garnering accolades from all over the musical landscape, and with lush production by Prefuse 73, it's easy to understand why.  The first single from the record, put out by Manimal Vinyl, is "Origins," and the track's accompanying video illuminates the duo against the backdrop of last fall's Southern California wildfires. 

Directed by Patrick Fraser

via XLR8R where this video premiered

Previous posts about Nico and Jenean:

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Jean-Michel Basquiat: The Radiant Child by Reckon

Trailer for the new documentary Jean-Michel Basquiat: The Radiant Child

Directed by Tamra Davis, the documentary features never-before seen footage of the prolific artist painting, talking about his art, and existing in the two years prior to his death in 1988. 

The OST features music from Mike D and Ad Rock. 

Jean-Michel Basquiat: The Radiant Child was released on Feb 21st.

Hat tip:  The Documentary Blog + Escape Into Life

The Radiant Child by Rene Ricard

Previous JMB posts:

 

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